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Archive for March, 2017

Last week, some members of my bellydance class performed at Tampon Tuesday, a local fundraiser for women living in shelters and half-way houses. The event was being held in a restaurant with no backstage area, so I finally needed to acquire a decent wrap so my costume would be hidden until it was time to perform. I came across a pattern here for a kimono style robe: http://peppermintmag.com/sewing-school/kimono-robe/.

I had a limited amount of fabric (some nice cotton left over from a nightie my mom had made for my daughter), and even less time. Therefore, I dispensed with the lining and the interfacing. The pattern says it’s one-size-fits-most but that isn’t quite true. I’m a bit taller and wider than most, but not hugely so. I would have been happier with a shorter robe that had more coverage in front. Still, it will do the job.

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A few weeks ago, I had the honour of celebrating the elevation of my friend Eluned into the Order of the Laurel, the highest arts award in the Society for Creative Anachronism. A traditional symbol for arts students in the Society is a green belt. I had never gotten around to giving one to Eluned, so when I heard she was making a green outfit for the occasion, I decided it would be a great little inside joke to make her a Viking-style belt with a laurel wreath carved into the buckle. There were only a few minor problems with this plan. It had been years since I had made a buckle, I didn’t know how to tablet weave, and it turned out the green outfit was actually for someone else. I didn’t let any of this stop me.

The pattern I used for the tablet weaving is based on one I found on line. Over the years, I have looked at many patterns and had a couple of people teach me the basics, but it never stuck. This time, after several tries, I was successful. This is the site I used: http://sca.claypool.me/weaving/basictabletweaving.html. The buckle itself is based on two buckles from Yorkshire. One is from 10th C Goodmanham, and the other is from 10th or 11th C York (Bone, Antler, Ivory & Horn by Arthur MacGregor, p 104).

bone buckle

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